6,000 Years of Tundra Fires in Noatak National Preserve

One of the 37 tundra fires that burned in Noatak National Preserve in the summer of 2010. The Kaluktavik River fire (Fire #561) burned more than 23,000 acres (9,300 ha) in July. Photo from Alaska Park Science.

Excerpt from: Higuera, P., Barnes, J., Chipman, M., Urban, M., and F.S. Hu. The Burning Tundra: A Look Back at the Last 6,000 Years of Fire in the Noatak National Preserve, Northwestern Alaska. Alaska Park Science 10 (1):  36-41.

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“Recovery After World’s Largest Tundra Fire Raises Questions”

From the Alaska Science Forum by Ned Rozell:

Four summers ago, Syndonia Bret-Harte stood outside at Toolik Lake, watching a wall of smoke creep toward the research station on Alaska’s North Slope. Soon after, smoke oozed over the cluster of buildings.

The great Anaktuvuk River tundra fire of 2007. Photo by Michelle Mack. (From Alaska Science Forum)

To read more of this article click here or visit the Alaska Science Forum website to view all of Ned’s recent articles.

What to know more?  Check out our previous post on the Anaktuvuk  River Fire with links to Michelle Mack’s research findings and other news articles.

New results show “how quickly one tundra fire can reverse a half-century worth of soil-stored carbon”

Satellite image of Anaktuvuk River Fire from Sept. 25, 2007 (NASA image courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center)

New findings from the 2007 Anaktuvuk River Fire revealed just how much carbon was  released into the atmosphere from this single fire and the potential role tundra fire disturbances play in feedbacks driving global climate change.

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