Webinar Summary: What do Forest Fires, Caribou, and Monster Truck Tires have in Common? by Matt Nolan

Dr. Matt  Nolan shared results from his recent airborne photogrammetry campaigns in Alaska, and related them to possible fire and forest management applications in a webinar on February 25, 2014.  There is now a 2-page Webinar Summary about the topic and you can also watch the recorded webinar on AFSC’s website <HERE>.  Dr. Nolan is a Research Associate Professor at UAF’s Institute of Northern Engineering with degrees in geophysics and arctic and mechanical engineering. He’sNolan-Webinar-2014-THUMB_Page_1 been pioneering new high-tech uses of an old tool—the aerial photo.  With new advances in computer processing and display technologies, airborne Digital SLR Photogrammetry is an even more powerful tool for field sciences, especially in remote areas like Alaska. Compared to LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging, or aerial 3D laser scanning), the low cost of DSLR photogrammetry makes it more affordable to make time-series of high-resolution maps, opening up  new possibilities for analyzing and understanding changes in the environment. Forest inventory, fire fuels assessments (like canopy height), snow depth, and post-burn vegetation recovery and monitoring are just a few examples of applications that could benefit from time-series of topographic measurements on an annual, monthly, or other repeating basis.

Dowload Webinar Summary <<LINK>>

Do Bark Beetles Affect Fire Occurrence/Property Value on the Kenai? Watch the Video.

Hansen Thesis DefenseIf you weren’t able to hear this talk in person, watch the video posted on Alaska Fire Science Consortium website: Linked Disturbance Interactions in South-Central Alaska:  Implications for Ecosystems and People.
For his MS Thesis, Winslow explored the social and ecological implications of changing boreal forest natural disturbance regimes. He analyzed how the occurrence of spruce bark beetle outbreak has altered the probability of subsequent wildfire activity between 2001 and 2009 on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska as well as the economic impact of fire and insect disturbances to private property values.    (By permission– Thanks Winslow!)

Did you miss this December Webinar? Video of “What is live fuel moisture: a new look at the combustion of living plants” is available for viewing!

Matt Jolly, PhD, from the USFS Fire, Fuel and Smoke Science Program, Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory presented the webinar on December 20th.  You can watch it on YouTube thanks to the Great Lakes Region Fire Consortium  at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAEYk2pEdJM

Live fuel moisture is measured frequently throughout the country as an indicator of potential fire behavior but little is known about the primary factors that drive their seasonal variations. Dr. Matt Jolly delves into the interactive factors that control live fuel moisture and discusses some of the potential implications of these factors on seasonal variations in the fire potential of living plants. He shows how the interactions between the water content of the foliage and seasonal changes in the leaf’s dry weight combine to influence calculated live fuel moisture and ultimately, its flammability.

By akfireconsortium Posted in Webinars

Feb 25 Webinar on WIMS by the Alaska Fire Applications and Modeling Committee

ImageJan Passek, USFWS Fire Specialist, and Heidi Strader, Weather Forecaster from the Alaska Interagency Coordination Center will demonstrate how to input daily weather observations used  to  calculate Fire Danger using WIMS–the Forest Service Weather Information Management System!  The Webinar is 1:30 p.m. AST on Monday, February 25th. Come join the webinar as we discuss: WIMS Roles and responsibilities, Access Control Lists- what are they, who controls them?, NFDRS, Firefamily Plus, Weather Detective skills and what to look for Monday mornings to ensure weekend weather is updated. Registration information is available from ayork@alaska.edu.

Link to recording <HERE>

Webinar Dec 20th- What is Live Fuel Moisture? A New Look at the Combustion of Live Plants

Fire in PIMA LEPA_JBarnes_250x195

Image from Jennifer Barnes, National Park Service

Date: Thursday, December 20, 2012
Time: 10:00 – 11:30 AM (AK Time)

Link to recording <HERE>

Presented by:  Matt Jolly, PhD
Research Ecologist, USFS
Fire, Fuel and Smoke Science Program
Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory

Live fuel moisture is measured frequently throughout the country as an indicator of potential fire behavior but little is known about the primary factors that drive their seasonal variations. Dr. Matt Jolly will delve into the interactive factors that control live fuel moisture and will discuss some of the potential implications of these factors on seasonal variations in the fire potential of living plants. Ultimately, he will show how the interactions between the water content of the foliage and seasonal changes in the leaf’s dry weight combine to influence calculated live fuel moisture and its flammability.

Read more about Dr. Jolly’s work with living plants and fire and the Missoula Fire Sciences Lab.

Related Resources:
Foliar moisture content input in the Canadian Forest Fire Behavior Prediction System for areas outside of Canada
Martin E. Alexander, 2010

Assessing the effect of foliar moisture on the spread rate of crown fires
Martin E. Alexander and Miguel G. Cruz, 2012

Join The Webinarr:

Click HERE to join this webinar (http://osu-pilot-conc.adobeconnect.com/dec202012/).

No pre-registration required.  This link will be active at 9:45 am AK Time on Dec 20th. Select “Enter as a Guest” and provide your name where prompted to participate.

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2012 Alaska Fire Science Workshop Presentations Now Posted!

All of the presentations, handouts, and recordings from the 2012 Alaska Fire Science Workshop are available for viewing/download <HERE>

Click on any of the topics below to watch the recording:

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Exhibit to Reveal ‘Art’ of Fire Science and Management

www.frames.gov/afsc/projects/art-of-fire     

Fairbanks, Alaska—Nine local artists will unveil work of varied media inspired by fire, fire management and fire science at the exhibit opening of “In a Time of Change: The Art of Fire” at the Bear Gallery in Pioneer Park Aug. 3.

The First Friday opening will be 5-7 p.m. and the exhibit will be on display during gallery hours, noon-8 p.m. daily, through Sept. 3.

“The Art of Fire” is part of a larger collaborative effort led by the Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research Station (LTER) to engage the arts, sciences and humanities in artistic exchanges regarding environmental issues, particularly climate change. Dubbing the network “In a Time of Change,” LTER has organized and helped fund similar events featuring visual, written and performance art in Fairbanks in recent years.

The Alaska Fire Science Consortium, a regional branch of a national fire science knowledge exchange network, saw “In a Time of Change” as an opportunity to bring new voices into conversations about fire science and management. AFSC partnered with LTER for “The Art of Fire” project, which focuses solely on visual artwork and is funded by the Joint Fire Science Program.

“This is really about building connections between the artistic talent we have in Fairbanks and managers and scientists throughout the state to promote awareness of fire and fire sciences in Alaska,” said Sarah Trainor, director of AFSC.

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Tundra burning in Alaska: Rare events or harbinger of climate change? Join the Webinar!

The 2007 Uluksian Fire (photo courtesy of P. Higuera).

Dr. Philip Higuera (assistant professor at the College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho) will be joining us for a webinar on May 24, 2012 (1:00-2:00 pm AKDT) entitled “Tundra burning in Alaska: Rare event of harbinger of climate change?”.  Philip’s current research is focused on how climate, vegetation, and human activities interact with fire occurrence and fire regimes (from across years to across millenia).  He is also the Director of the Paleoecology and Fire Ecology Lab  where students and researchers work on charcoal and pollen analysis in lake-sediment records,  dendrochronology, and spatially-explicit modeling and analyses for areas in the US Rocky Mountains, Alaska, and abroad in Tasmania, Australia.

Link to recording <HERE>

Webinar at a Glance:

Dr. Philip Higuera will be presenting results from past and ongoing research focused on understanding the causes and consequences of tundra burning in the past, present, and future. The talk will integrate several lines of work, including reconstructing tundra fire history in the recent and distant past (2000-14,000 yr), quantifying relationships among modern climate, vegetation, and tundra burning, and anticipating future tundra burning given future climate scenarios.

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Once Burned, Twice Shy: Webinar Wrap Up

Here’s a big Thank You to everyone who attended last week’s webinar “Once burned, twice shy”, presented on Feb. 23rd.  For those who could not attend or who have been eagerly awaiting the follow up materials, please feel free to  explore the videos, documents and links below.  (For more information, see our previous post on this webinar.)

In Summary

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(Slides by Dr. Carissa Brown.)

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Once burned, twice shy: Repeat fires result in black spruce regeneration failure (Webinar)

A re-burned fire with little to no black spruce regeneration, 2007. Photo courtesy of C. Brown.

Dr. Carissa Brown, Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Sherbrooke, will be joining us for a webinar on February 23, 2012 (11:00 am to noon AKST) entitled “Once burned, twice shy: Repeat fires result in black spruce regeneration failure.”  Dr. Brown is currently studying plant species and communities at the edge of their range, focusing on the direct and indirect effects of climate change on species distribution at northern latitudes. Most recently, her work has focused on the responses to altered fire frequency at the northern margin of the boreal forest, particularly in black spruce forests.

Link to recording <HERE>

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